ENPSYCHLOPEDIA RSS



ENVY

As we dive into our discussion of ENVY I think it’s important to point out that envy and jealousy are in fact different. Not only do they manifest differently but they actually exist in completely different regions of the brain. Jealousy is an emotional response to the perceived threat of losing a meaningful relationship to someone else. Like losing a best friend or partner to a new friend or lover. Or fear of Losing the attention of a parent to a brand new baby sister. Because jealousy is seen as a direct threat to losing something we hold dear, it effects the frontal lobe, the part of the brain crucial to emotional regulation, more specifically the lateral septum located in...

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PET LOSS

I have always grown up with dogs, and as heart wrenching as it is to lose a pet, I never fully understood the loss until I held my dog Stella Blue during her last breaths. That loss, still hurts. Even nearly 11 years later. Stella Blue was my first baby girl and no doubt her spirit lives on strong in the daughter I birthed a year after Stellie’s death. Friends speak of the silence immediately following the death of a pet. Like the quiet of the house becomes deafening. No barking, howling, meows. It’s quiet. It’s strange. And it hurts.  Scientists now know that grief associated with pet loss is specific. It can be as intense as losing a loved...

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COMPARISON

So I have a ton of thoughts on this. Most of which go strongly against every single super pretty Instagram motivational poster targeted toward women that I've ever seen. Is that specific enough for you? We are sold some bullshit on comparison, especially women and especially artists. Comparison, even social comparison, its modern day evil twin is  actually a good thing and if you can harvest it, comparison is a super power. Here’s why. The first thing to understand about comparison is that there is ZERO chance that your brain will not engage in it in some way. That’s right, zero chance. In fact, studies show that as much as 10% of our thoughts at any given time center around comparisons...

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WORRY

The best advice I ever received about worry, wasn’t from a psychotherapist, it wasn’t even during my study of psychology or working in my private practice. It was the moment my daughter was born. My doctor placed her on my chest, looked me and my partner right in the eyes and said, “Mom, it’s your job to worry. Dad, it’s your job to deal with it.” Big moment all around and I’m surprised alongside the drama of childbirth I remember that advice so clearly. Perhaps it’s because I grew up being consumed by worry, mostly because no one had ever given me permission to have it. Worry, especially for kids is often met with, “don’t worry, everything will be okay.”...

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AESTHETIC EMOTION

Aesthetic emotion is inherently connected to what psychologists and philosophers call the aesthetic experience. At its core, an aesthetic experience is one that pertains to the appreciation of aesthetic objects and resulting pleasures. Such pleasure is not extracted from the usefulness or utilitarian qualities or relationship with an object, but the result of the feelings and sensations we experience when we glean the intrinsic qualities of aesthetic objects and experiences themselves. So, essentially what we feel when we experience a piece of visual art, music, dance, or any other object or experience our mind deems as aesthetic. Now this is where things get really interesting to me. Scientists, mostly neuropsychologists who study aesthetics and the expanding field of neuroaesthetics, have...

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